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Izaak Walton Campout October 2019

Our October campout was our shooting campout so we drove for 30 minutes to our campsite by the ranges. The first morning, everybody woke up, ate breakfast, and washed their dishes. We all walked over to the archery range and took our turns shooting arrows at targets. Afterwards, we went to the shotgun range. We spent a while there shooting clay pigeons and we also ate our lunches there. When we got to the rifle range, it was too full, so we went back to the campsite and formed stations that would help scouts get their requirements signed off. We had first aid, lashings, and fire building. We got through one rotation before it was our turn for riflery, so we walked back to the range and got our safety gear on. By the time we had shot 2 or 3 times, it had been a while, so we headed back to the campsite and went back to the stations. Once we finished all three rotations, we used the final group’s fire to make the big fire for dinner. We all ate dinner and then hurried over to the indoor air rifle range. We waited for about 30 minutes but the people in charge of the range didn’t show up so they sent us back to the campsite to have a campfire. We couldn’t get the fire started and it had taken too long once we did start one, so we went back up to the campsite and then had a campfire with the fire from dinner. We went to bed pretty late and we had to pack up all of our things that night because it was going to rain the next morning and we had to get out of the campsite quickly. We woke up the next morning and got our tents packed up and left the campsite really early because it was raining. We discussed our roses, buds, and thorns in the parking lot and then went to IHOP for breakfast. It was an action packed weekend!

Scout Master Minute 4/2

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Today we worked on Cyber Chip. I think you all know that this was a scout requirement that I signed off on before many of you did it. I’ll be honest with you, I didn’t read the requirement thoroughly enough to realize there was a troop component to the requirement. But once it was brought to my attention, we collectively made a plan to do the requirement. Given it was my mistake, I didn’t take your scout badges back. But I did ensure that it would be done at an upcoming meeting.

This situation is an example of how a scout is Trustworthy. A scout should strive to do and behave in a way that is honest and truthful. And when a scout makes an honest mistake, she tells the truth and makes it better, even if it might be uncomfortable or inconvenient. Our troop is made stronger when each scout is trustworthy. The scout manual says: “A Scout tells the truth.  A Scout is honest and keeps promises. People can depend on a Scout.

People can depend on a Scout. In the Scouting program, we depend on each other to make the program work. Whether or not we are leaders, we each have a duty. Throughout your time as a scout you will probably be a patrol leader, an instructor, a grubmaster, the senior patrol leader, the webmaster, or one of many other positions that require you to do certain tasks, which, if you don’t do, will impact the way the meeting or campout in big and small ways. 

Sometimes you’ll hit the mark and do everything just right. But other times, you’ll fall short of expectations. It is important to remember that trustworthiness doesn’t require perfection, it requires honesty and effort. If you make a mistake, own it and make a plan to make it better and not repeat the mistake. Like we did with the cyber chip requirement. 

As you get more experience as a scout and as a leader and you’ll develop your dependability and trustworthiness, which will benefit you throughout your life.